All Saints CofE Aided Infant School

Love to Learn and Learn to Love

Forest School engages and inspires our pupils to learn and explore in a woodland setting, whilst teaching self-esteem, team work and how to truly value the stunning natural world"What an amazing Sports Day! Watching the children support and cheer each other on was just lovely and demonstrates, yet again, what a special school All Saints has become"All Saints aims to provide a happy, family atmosphere in a Christian Community which delights in learning in a safe, stimulating environment."I consider my child very lucky to be attending a school that is teaching her, not only the ever-changing curriculum, but also (and far more importantly) that it is fun to LEARN"“There is a good range of high quality additional activities that enrich the curriculum and promote pupil’s development and enjoyment” Ofsted

Pupil Premium strategy

Strategy Statement:

The strategy that the school has adopted is one of focusing any money directly on improving pupils’ outcomes through high quality teaching and interventions. We do not isolate these pupils, teaching them alongside their peers for the majority of the time, supplemented with individual interventions to suit individual needs. It is important for their self-esteem that they can achieve alongside their peers, some of whom are not in this group but have similar needs.

Additional funding is allocated to enable us to support all our disadvantaged children.  More able PP pupils are identified and work alongside their peers to ensure they achieve their very best.

This strategy has been very effective over a number of years for PP children and other children within the school, as reflected in our results in all year groups. We analyse the performance of all children on a termly basis and make any changes to provision as necessary.

What is the Pupil Premium?

The Pupil Premium was introduced by the Government in April 2011. It was designed to give additional money to support schools in raising the attainment of children who receive free school meals, children whose parents serve in the Armed Forces and those children in local authority care. These groups of children have been identified nationally as achieving at a lower level than children from less disadvantaged backgrounds. For example, national figures show that 11 year olds who are eligible for Free School Meals are around twice as likely not to achieve Level 4 in maths and English as other 11 year olds.

 

Where does the money come from?

Pupil Premium is allocated to schools based on the number of children who are currently known to be eligible for Free School Meals, whose parents serve in the Armed Forces and children who have been looked after in local authority care continuously for more than six months.

The purpose of the Pupil Premium is to help schools to provide targeted support for vulnerable children- not necessarily just children who qualify for FSM.“It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium, allocated to schools…. is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.” (Source – DfE website) The funding is therefore given to schools to spend as they think best, although there is a requirement to publish online how this money is spent.

 

Pupil Premium Funding for the financial year 2017-18

 

Pupil Premium Funding for the financial year 2015-16

The school received an additional £1,320 to ensure any vulnerable children were given appropriate interventions to ensure good progress.

This is how we used the funding.

 

 

 

Pupil Premium Funding for the financial year 2014-15

The school received no additional funding during this academic year.

 

 

Pupil Premium Funding for the financial year 2013-2014

The school received an additional £2,859 to ensure any vulnerable children were given appropriate interventions to ensure good progress.

This is how we used the funding.

 

 

AWARDS